About your Search

20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
. not the revenue. the revenue is nice if we don't hurt people. the goal is to save the environment and reduce global warming. >>stuart: you think carbon taxes will save the land it? >>guest: yes. we need to reduce the carbon emissions. >>stuart: are you worried about the next big storm because we are putting out too much carbon? >>guest: i am. a lot of people in new york city and tri-state area are still suffering. so i am worried. i am worried, more, for what my children and grandchild will experience in big storms if we don't get behind this and start resolving it. >>stuart: you have a rebate system that stops middle income and poor people from paying it but business would? >>guest: absolutely. the american interprice institute prefer the carbon tax to, for instance --. >>stuart: they prefer nothing. they do not want any tax but if they have to have one they want a straightforward tax. you think we will get it? >>guest: i do. it will be the republicans proposing it. >>stuart: the republicans the propose this? you might be right, the right would prefer a carbon tax to increased taxes on inco
fear. and didn't happen. going forward, miss schaefer, certainly it is a very challenging environment for the republican party because you have a dependency in this country when more than half of the american homes are receiving some kind of entitlement. so much of that's earned, but a lot of it is not. more than half. they're becoming more and more dependent on washington rather than the republican vision, less and less. >> right. i think one thing democrats have been very successful at is creating many more wards of the state, if you will. that's a serious cultural shift that republicans are up against now. they need to really make the -- get the message out there that limiting -- >> bill: what would that message be though? don't take the free stuff, make it on your own? you think that message is really going to get through? in this day and age? >> it would have to be more nuance. when we're talking to women, for instance, i think they need to explain how protective legislation in the workplace, for instance, doesn't actually give you more freedom or more flexibility. >> bill: that'
back really. i'm just focused on trying to figure out what to do in this environment like i would be in any which brings us to the stock market. already sending a message to washington perhaps about the necessity of a deal on the fiscal cliff. six out of the last seven sessions have been negative. down more than 5% on fears about it but you've been bringing up the market action similarity to a certain extent to 20 plus years ago. a year ago let's not forget we were starting to deal with europe. it did not end until we got ltro, long-term refinancing operations from ecb that said we're going to -- it's not going to go bankrupt today. that's when we were watching italy above 7%. today those ten-year yields up 4.5, 4.6. >> talk about how italy has come. the economy is better than other countries. northern part of italy is increasing industrial production. that's impressive. they never gave up. italian banks some are happy with no problems funding. the reason i go back which is of the analogy why i go back that far. that's a tuesday, wednesday thing in europe. you focus on when ecb me
do not want to think about them as an increase. just stop the cut in an environment where it is absolutely essential. i had no children. maybe i will not feel it did not much. but like the last caller said i am ready to pay my their share. and the thing is that fairness is not guaranteed. but this is where i put my emphasis, what is democracy? we have got to try to work and create fairness. a graduated income tax is the best way to pay according to the ability to pay. the more you give, the more you pay. what is complicated? guest: the caller brings up a great point. this idea of tax fairness. who should pay more? another caller brought up before. what this caller is scion is that something that the president echoed again and again on the campaign trail. and he feels like this as part of the government moving forward. part of the tax fairness issue is at the wealthy should pay more to help pay down the deficit. the other caller was saying he feels like more people should pay federal income taxes to pay down the federal it deficit. this is sort of the two ways that the part
the regulatory environment of a second obama term. in the past 90 days the obama administration has posted 6,125 regulations and notices on its regulations.gov website, an average of 68 a day, jenna. jenna: wow, doug mcelway live from d.c. thank you. rick: frustration turning to violence after weeks without power on long island, new york. an electrical worker is now in the hospital after getting sucker punched by an angry long island resident. john apple white came up from florida to help out with the recovery efforts. he had been working 16-hour days when he was hit. now he's recovering from a broken jaw and cracked cheekbone. >> he gave me no signs of anything aggressive. he was in a nice vehicle, dressed fairly nice from what i could tell. as soon as i got within an arm's reach of him he decked me. i'm not going to let it get me down. i even skroeu what i do enjoy what i do. i'm not going to let one person spoil this. >> others are taking utility companies to court following a class action lawsuit against the long island power authority. do they have a case? lis wiehl is a fox news legal
exactly how to get things done, exactly in a partisan political environment. sound familiar? what lessons want we learn from him? joining us now, author of a new fantastic book called "thomas jefferson, the art of power." john meachem joins us live. >> you talk about how thomas jefferson, as he gets up first thing ing, as many people are now, he had a ritual he would plunge his feet into a base son of cold quarter. >> it is. there's a groove on the floor where the bowl was brought in. but he lived to be 84 so it's a pretty good policy. >> maybe i need a bucket. thomas jefferson was a guy who loved politics. he loved to design stuff, he was a big thinker, he kept great details but at the end of the day he was a guy who could bring two sides together. north, south, come on, let's wind up in the middle. >> he had endless appetite for art, for wine, for women, for architectural books and also power. he was born to it in virginia. the eldest son in an important family. i learned from a very early age. he was was a political apprentice. for 40 years he was pretty much in public office. and what
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)